Wednesday, May 09, 2007

The Girls by Lori Lansens

The Girls
By Lori Lansens

1.
The Girls is written as a fictional autobiography. Why do you think the author chose this format? Did you ever have to remind yourself while reading that the book is a novel rather than a memoir?

2. Rose and Ruby have spent every moment of their lives bound to each other, and yet they have forged two very distinct personalities and ways of looking at the world. What does this novel say about identity? How does each sister manifest individuality? In what ways do they borrow from each other?

3. Throughout the book we are let in on information that Rose and Ruby don't tell each other. What role do secrets play in the story? Were you surprised by some of the things Rose and Ruby kept from each other? What about Aunt Lovey and Uncle Stash?

4. Aunt Lovey is portrayed by Rose and Ruby as a very wise woman. Is it possible that their perception of her is influenced by their deep gratitude for her sacrifices in raising them? Why do you think they never refer to her as their mother?

5. Did you find yourself forgetting that Rose and Ruby were joined at the head? In what way is the bond of sisterhood more important than their physical link?

6. The girls said that, if given the chance, they wouldn't want to be separated. Is this a sentiment you understand? How does the dynamic of the girls relate to real-life relationships you've been in or witnessed?

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